Blue Ridge Parkway Artist, Terror Town and How Many Poets does it take to Change a Light Bulb?


Blue Ridge Parkway Artist

 

summerpathcopyrightSummer Path at Rock Castle Gorge   Original 30″x40″ Oil Painting   $2425

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at  KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

violrockyknobcopyrightViolet Rocky Knob Evening   Original 16″x20″ Oil Painting     $640

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at  KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

wildflowbrsunsetcopyrightWildflowers by a Blue Ridge Sunset  Original Painting has been Sold

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

Blue Ridge Parkway Terror Town

Located 1 mile past Zooland Campground on Pisgah Covered Bridge Road outside of Asheville (.5 mile past Forest Hills). There is old farmland there with a number of hauntings that have been reported over the years. The farm is made up of about 18 acres with several farmhouses scattered throughout.

A little girl’s voice is heard deep in the forest. A boy who hung himself there haunts the upper farm.

An old lady and her husband haunt one of the houses. Her brother died in the woods near the house and can now be heard singing at night while he makes moonshine.

A shadow of a black horse has been seen running through the woods and then vanishes. There is a company who uses the location now for a haunted attraction called Terror Town so it is very easy to access during hours when they are there working. One of the staff lives at the park so don’t try to visit this one without permission.

 

I found this story on The Blue Ridge Parkway Guide online publication

Life with The Word and Bird Man -Clyde Kessler

THIS IS NOT MEANT TO BE A SLUR ON MY HUSBAND OR OTHER POETS!  IT IS JUST A FUNNY INCIDENT.

How many poets does it take to change a light bulb?  In this case  – none.  An electrician was called in to do the job.

The other day my husband replaced the bulb in our porch light.   Later, he turned on the light and it didn’t work so he turned the switch off so he could see if the bulb was broken.  As soon as he touched the bulb it shattered into a zillion little pieces.

As luck would have it we had already arranged to have an electrician over to work on a broken ceiling fan so he checked the circuit to make sure nothing was wrong with the light fixture.  It was just a faulty bulb!

I hope you enjoyed paintings by an artist of The Blue Ridge Parkway

Blue Ridge Parkway Artist and We Were Barely in The Twentieth Century…


Blue Ridge Parkway Artist

 

ridgelandcopyrightjpg

Winter Ridgeland Beauty  Original 8″x10″ Oil Painting   $168

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

I still have a lot of paintings to post that I haven’t already posted but I am running out of time today so here are some favorites!

 

nearpurgatorycopyrightNear Purgatory  Original Painting has been Sold

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

eveglowrockcastlecopyrightjpgEvening Glow at Rock Castle Gorge   Original 30″x40″ Oil Painting     $2425

Prints on Paper or Canvas Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

Life with The Word and Bird Man – Clyde Kessler

My husband and I have never been that great with technology.  When computers took over I didn’t want to keep up which is a decision I regret since no one can escape now.  Anyway, my husband says we were barely with it in the twentieth century when it turned into the twenty-first!  Still catching up every day! Yikes!

I hope you enjoyed paintings by an artist of The Blue Ridge Parkway

Blue Ridge Parkway Artist, Legend of Tom Dooley, and Careful with Those Sparklers!


Blue Ridge Parkway Artist

 

libertysmall (1)Liberty  Original 8″x10″ Oil Painting      $168

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available    KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

thomasgood (1)Wonder  Original Painting has Been Sold

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at    KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

jamesreflectionscopyrightReflections on The James River     Original Oil Painting      $2425

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at    KENDALL KESSLER ART

The Legend of Tom Dooley

In 1866, a woman named Laura Foster was murdered in Wilkes County. A man named Tom Dula, pronounced “Dooley”, was convicted and hanged for the crime. That murder and the name Tom Dooley lives on in one of the most famous folk songs ever to come out of North Carolina.

The story of a dashing Tom Dula that returns home from the war to fall in love with a young woman that was being courted by a school teacher is not the accurate story.  If you would like to read the true story you can find it in Stories from The Mountains online publication.  I would rather stick to the fanciful, romantic one.  Laura Foster was being courted by Bob Grayson. Foster fell in love with Tom Dula, but so did another woman, Anne Melton. Melton was married, wealthy, beautiful, and insanely jealous. Learning that Dula was in love with Foster, not her, Anne Melton stabbed Laura Foster to death in a jealous rage.

Tom Dula was blamed for the murder. Tula fled, heading for Tennessee. Bob Grayson headed a posse to hunt down Tom Dula, and he was dragged back to Wilkes County. Dula, realizing that it was Anne Melton who committed the crime, confesses out of a chivalrous desire to save her from a death by hanging.

On May 1, 1868, Tom Dula was executed for the murder of Laura Foster. Grayson returned home to the North. Anne Melton went slowly insane from guilt.

It’s this version of the tale, a complicated story story that ends in the death of an innocent man, that became immortalized in a folk song that circulated in North Carolina for nearly 100 years before it was made nationally famous by the Kingston Trio in 1958. Their recording of the ballad Tom Dooley reached #1 on the Billboard R&B charts, and rose to the top of the country music charts.

THE REAL STORY IS SOMETHING ELSE!

I got this story from Stories from The Mountains online publication

 

Life with The Word and Bird Man – Clyde Kessler

My husband is a cautious man.  He is great about car up keep and is always advising me on the weather.  He is also very cautious with fireworks.  We only use sparklers due to all the accidents every year with the other ones.  What I didn’t know is sparklers are much more dangerous than most people think they are.

Sparklers remain one of the most dangerous fireworks in terms of accident statistics simply because they are taken for granted. Year after year people underestimate the dangers of these traditional items and get burnt.

Be sure to have a bucket of water nearby and only light one at a time.  Many accidents have occurred when two of these extremely hot sticks (several hundred degrees celsius) cross and cause a flare up.

 

So be Safe!

 

I hope you enjoyed my paintings by an artist of The Blue Ridge Parkway

Blue Ridge Parkway Artist, Chicken Alley Ghost, and Floyd Fest is coming Soon!


 

Blue Ridge Parkway Artist

anotherrockyknobcopyrightAnother Rocky Knob  Original 8″x10″ Oil Painting    $168

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

sidestreetcopyrightSide Street     Original 20″x16″ Acrylic Painting    $670

Prints on Paper or Canvas And Greeting Cards Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

Another one of my recent paintings from my Kendall Expressions.  In these paintings I am letting my expressive side take over!   We sure wish we could get some rain.  We are so dry right now.

 

The Ghost of Chicken Alley

Chicken Alley is a small, narrow alley in Downtown Asheville. Named because of the chickens that would congregate there in the city’s earlier days, the most prominent chicken found today in Chicken Alley is the one in the large mural by local artist Molly Must that decorates the entrance.

Dr. Jamie Smith was a physician who practiced in Asheville at the end of the Nineteenth Century. He always carried his medicine bag and a cane with a silver pommel on it. He was known as a man who loved a good time.

Asheville was a rougher city in those days. Men who worked in the logging camps and nearby industries would flood the town on weekends looking for a drink and some company.  Liquor flowed freely, virtue was easily bought and sold, and Dr. Smith loved every minute of it. There are those who say that the majority of his practice came treating the various social diseases that were the constant companions of the city’s good times.

All of this came to an end in 1902, when Dr. Smith walked in to a bar called Broadway’s Tavern, which was located in Chicken Alley. In a case of remarkably bad timing, Smith happened to stumble into the middle of a vicious bar brawl. He tried to break it up, but was stabbed in the heart by one of the men in the fight. He died instantly.

Jamie Smith’s murderer was never caught. Broadway’s Tavern burned to the ground the year after the fatal stabbing.

Ever since that night, people have reported seeing a strange figure walking in the alley late at night.  He carries an old-fashioned physician’s bag and a cane with a silver head.

The people who live Chicken Alley believe that this is the ghost of Dr. Jamie Smith. He has been seen for over 100 years, and throughout that time the figure’s appearance has been described with remarkable consistency. Dr. Smith’s fashion sense was apparently distinctive enough to make him recognizable even beyond the grave. The locals are divided as to the reason his spirit returns to the spot where he met his end. Some say he is still trying to stop the fight. Some say he still just wants a drink.

How to Get There

Chicken Alley is located in downtown Asheville between Broadway and Lexington. The Alley runs between Carolina Lane and Woodfin Street, and the entrance on Woodfin is clearly distinguishable by the large chicken mural.

 

chicken alley

I found this story on Stories from the Mountains online Publication

Life with The Bird and Word Man – Clyde Kessler

The popular Floyd Fest is coming soon!  This is a gala event with music and activities!  The Blue Ridge Discovery Center will be there, too!

 

Floyd Fest
When Jul 25 – 27, 2014
Where Floyd, VA
In cooperation with the New River Land Trust, BRDC will host a series of educational booth activities throughout the week.

I hope you enjoyed my paintings by an artist of The Blue Ridge Parkway

 

Blue Ridge Parkway Artist, Story of the Origin of the Word Hootenanny, and The Word Man gets Published Again!


Blue Ridge Parkway Artist

 

whitevasecopyrightThe White Vase    Original 14″x10″ Oil Painting   $295

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

 

rosesdrivewaycopyrightSpring Roses   Original 24″x 20″ Oil Painting   $980

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available at   KENDALL KESSLER ART

Two of my favorite florals!

 

mountainsunsetcopyrightBlue Ridge Sunrise   Original Painting has been Sold

Prints on Paper or Canvas and Greeting Cards Available   KENDALL KESSLER ART

The Story of Boojum and Hootin’ Annie

Eagle Nest Mountain stands at the southern edge of the Balsam mountain range and was once home to the luxurious Eagle Nest Hotel. Guests at the hotel soon began to hear the story of a strange creature who lived in the area. The thing was not quite a man and not quite an animal — it stood about eight feet tall and every inch of its body was covered with shaggy grey hair, except for its human face. The creature was named Boojum, and he seemed to be harmless enough, but he did have two all-too human habits.

The first of these was the Boojum was greedy and he loved to hoard gems. Rubies and emeralds are found naturally throughout the mountains of North Carolina, and Boojum loved to hunt for these pretty, precious stones and hide them away in his own treasure hoards.  He would then bury them in one of the secret caves on the mountain

Boojum’s second habit  was that he loved to look at pretty girls. Back in those days, a young woman who wanted to have a bath might head off into the woods to find a secluded pond at the base of a waterfall. There, safe from human eyes, she could strip down and bathe. A young woman enjoying herself in the water would often hear a rustle in the bushes and look up to see his hairy face peering down at her.

Now, most of these girls would quickly gather up their clothes and run off back home as soon as they saw him. But one young woman named Annie was braver than most, and one day when she was bathing in a stream deep in the balsam groves on Eagle Nest, she looked up and saw Boojum staring down at her. But Annie didn’t run, in fact, she looked into Boojum’s sorrowful eyes and saw that above all else he was just another lonely soul living on the mountain. Annie fell in love with those sad eyes, and she fell in love with Boojum, and she left her home and her family to go and live with Boojum deep in the mountain woods as his wife.

As much as Boojum loved Annie, and as much as Annie loved Boojum, Boojum still hung on to his love of jewels. On certain nights, he would leave his bride alone and go searching for jewels on the mountain. Annie, growing lonely, would go out in search of Boojum, and she developed a peculiar holler, something that sounded like a cross between a monkey and a hooting owl, that she would use to call out to Boojum. Boojum would use the same cry to call back to her, and eventually the two calls would come closer together until they came together on the hills.

Annie and Boojum calling to each other was often heard by guests at the Eagle Nest Hotel. Folklorist John Parris has said that Annie’s owl-like holler was the source of the term “Hootenanny,” which appeared in the language around the turn of the twentieth century and meant any kind of party or get-together. In the 1960’s the term was expanded by pop artists to mean a gathering of folk musicians.

 

I got this great story from Stories from the Mountains online publication

 

Life with The Word and Bird Man – Clyde Kessler

 

The Word Man really is tearing up the Publishing Turf these days!  He was notified last night of four more accepted poems!

Editor Vanessa Eccles accepted four poems for the Fall Issue of Belle Rêve Literary Journal: A Southern Experience. That is scheduled for November 2014.
 
Poems are “Distances”, “Everything Is A Wager”, “Snow Frogs” and “Talking”.
 
The title of the magazine is from Tennessee Williams’ play A Streetcar Named Desire. Belle Rêve is the name of the plantation home of Blanche & Stella.
 
 
Here is this magazine’s web page:
 
 

I hope you enjoyed my paintings by an artist of The Blue Ridge Parkway

 

Up and Running!


pathpandapascopyrightPath near Pandapas    Original Oil Painting has been Sold

Prints on Paper or Canvas Available at    KENDALL KESSLER ART

Lots to do and I have already got a lot done!  I guess there are advantages to being a poor sleeper.  Cheers!